How is your Game Sense?

What do we learn in PE?

Next week we will have parents come to visit us in our classes as part of our ‘Spotlight On Specials’ and ‘Student Led Conferences’. To an untrained eye it looks like children play some games and learn some skills – while this is partly true  all our games are carefully chosen with a purpose in mind. For example my Grade 4 class is playing continuous cricket as part of a lengthy “Game Sense unit” . Students in Grade 4 are exploring the concept of games sense across  the four categories of games.

  1. striking and fielding
  2. net wall games
  3. Invasion games
  4. target games

In cricket this week we are no longer focusing on the motor skills of batting and bowling and fielding but on the decisions we make when playing striking and fielding games. Students are asked questions such as

  • Batter: Where should the batter aim to hit the ball to give you a better chances of scoring a run?
  • Batter: How can you complete the run and still know where the ball is?
  • Fielder: How can you work together to best cover the space available to the batter?
  • Fielder: Does the batter have a favorite shot? How can you try to be ready for this?
  • Bowler: Where will you aim the ball to make it hard for the batter or to bowl them out?

In the early years in Kindergarten learn to throw, catch, kick, dribble, balance, jump etc but they also learn about safety, taking turns, sharing and there is a lot of language learning which we call ‘movement vocabulary’ that children are developing. If your child knows the difference between an underhand and overhand throw and they know to step forward with the opposite foot when throwing, and they actually know what the word ‘opposite’ means, the chances are they learnt this in PE. If they can name the parts of the body and the directions we can move our body and the actions we can do with our body then this is part of their developing movement vocabulary.

SPORTS DAY ONE MONTH AWAY!

_MG_0298The elementary school annual sports day is now one month away on Feb 14th! All families are invited to attend. All children will bring home a program on Friday Feb 7th for ES Sports day and we will also post the program on our PE blogs and on ES bulletin boards at ISM . Our focus is understanding that physical activity provides opportunities for health, enjoyment, self expression, challenge and social interaction as well building a sense of community and school spirit for teachers students and their families.

Students will participate as a class in a variety of activities in different venues. We would like parents to assist the supervisor at each activity or participate in the activities with your child. So please come dressed ready to join in the fun! We also need two parents per grade level to take photographs on Sports day to be used in the Closing Ceremony slide shows. If interested please contact Steve McCallum McCallums@ismanila.org  before Feb 1st to go through the protocols for taking photos.

We encourage students to display good sportsmanship. As parents you can play a significant role in helping your child become a good sport.  Here are some ways to help your child develop good sportsmanship and ensure that sports day is a positive experience.

 

1. Be a good role model for your children. Children learn by example, so show them how to practice good sportsmanship by not always expecting to win. Explain that winning is not always an option, but that it is always appropriate to be a good sport.

2. Good sportsmanship is a side effect of having good character. Teach your children how to interact with their elders, coaches and peers with a positive attitude, one that shows respect for all involved in the game.

3 Healthy competition is great, but make sure to emphasize other aspects of the game. Friendship, skill, exercise and good sportsmanship are major factors that contribute to a successful experience. After games ask your child “Did you enjoy that?” “That looked like fun!” rather than “Did you win?” Remember the number one reason that children consistently give as to why they participate in sport, is to have fun and be with friends. Emphasize this aspect in your post game conversations. We want to convey a love of the game rather than a love of winning so all children will continue to be active, enjoy and play sports throughout their lifetime.

We look forward to seeing you on Sports Day 20144388356521_919f7783c6_MG_0205

ES Physical Education Team

Grade 4 Unit Overviews

GRADE 4 UNIT OVERVIEWS

 

Unit

Description

Ball Handling Skills

(indoor /outdoor)

 

Students perform and start to demonstrate advanced characteristics of ball handling skills including throwing, catching, kicking, dribbling with the hands and feet, volleying and striking with both short and long handles. They consider the safety considerations when playing striking and kicking games. Students participate in the US based motor skill challenge. This involves a series of tasks requiring mastery of throwing, catching, volleying, jump rope, dynamic balancing, and striking skills. Students discuss the process of skill improvement and identify a goal for personal skill improvement and a sport they enjoy. They come to understand that people who develop and master basic sport skills are more likely to be active and participate successfully in a range of sports without embarrassment.

 

Fit For Life including Jump Rope For Heart Students discuss physical activity for health and identify which components of health related fitness are developed through various sports and activities. Students complete a concept map and then revisit at the end of the unit to identify any learning that has occurred. They participate in a circuit of fitness activities including jump rope skills.

 

Game Sense

 

Students learn about game sense. The focus is the game rather than a practice session or technique.  This may be as simple as knowing to predominantly move the ball towards your goal end in an invasion game. Situations are created where players take on the responsibility of finding solutions for themselves. They begin to explore the concept of game sense including offense and defense, creating and denying space. They look at the four game categories; invasion games, net wall games, target games and striking/fielding games and identify the purpose and basic game sense for these categories.

Students participate in small sided modified games of hockey, softball, netball, badminton, soccer, basketball, cricket and volleyball where they begin to apply game sense.

 

Dance Students perform a response to a rhythmical theme through learning simple social and folk dances assisting students to view dance as an activity that is fun, health promoting, artistic, recreational and socially rewarding. They participate in a Flash Mob Dance of their choosing.
Gymnastics Students use previously learnt skills to work independently in small groups designing and refining and performing a gymnastic routine. They complete a group self-assessment or peer assessment rubric on how well they managed their time (self-directed) and contributed as part of a group.  They also develop a performance assessment rubric to measure the success of their routine in terms of audience appeal. As part of this unit students revise rotation and balance skills and continue to develop a range of skills using various gymnastic apparatus. They also participate in the Grade 4 PE Central Challenge Balance Beam Task (see link)

 

 

Swimming Students participate in the Australian Swim and Survive water safety and stroke development program. Swim and Survive provides a broad, balanced program of swimming, water safety and survival skills, including basic techniques of clothed survival swimming.  The focus in Grade 4 is to reinforce the learner’s understanding of water safety, develop good judgement skills and to extend personal swimming and survival abilities, including basic techniques of clothed survival swimming. Drawing from personal experiences, students discuss all the activities, such as sailing, snorkelling and surfing, we can participate in once we are confident and competent swimmers.

Grade 3 Unit Overviews

 

GRADE 3 UNIT OVERVIEWS

 

Unit

Description

Ball Handling Skills

(indoor / outdoor)

Students practice, extend and refine their range of manipulative skills including dribbling with hands and feet, striking with long and short handles, kicking, volleying, throwing and catching. They consider the safety considerations when playing striking and kicking games. Students recall and apply skill cues as part of their process of skill acquisition. They identify a goal for personal skill improvement.

 

Circus Students develop movement competence through activities focussing on locomotor, jumping, landing, rolling, balancing, throwing and catching movements. They participate in circus skills including stilt walking, unicycles, juggling, barrel walking, Chinese yo yo, and plate spinning. The design, refine and perform a short circus routine or mastery of an age appropriate skill. They are guided both a self-assessment and peer assessment task.

 

Game Making

Introduction to 4 games classification

 

Students learn about the common features of games. They participate in a variety of modified target, striking/ fielding, net/wall and invasion games. Using a Venn diagram they explore the similarities and differences between the four categories of games. They consider the safety considerations when playing games. Students participate in Lead Up Games that involve the use of two or more sport skills, rules or tactics used in playing sport. They cooperate in a small group to create a game and perform the game for other groups. Students participate in the “Passport To Play” program.
Swimming Students participate in the Australian Swim and Survive water safety and stroke development program. Swim and Survive provides a broad, balanced program of swimming, water safety and survival skills.  The focus in Grade 3 is to further develop the learner’s sensible judgement of water safe behaviour by means of water safety, swimming and survival activities. Students identify why swimming is an important lifelong skill. Students extend their movement vocabulary to include the names of competitive and survival strokes and survival skills such as sculling, treading water, and dry land rescues.
Dance Students perform a response to a rhythmical theme through learning simple social and folk dances assisting students to view dance as an activity that is fun, health promoting, artistic, recreational and socially rewarding.
Fit For Life Students participate in activities that develop cardiovascular fitness. They identify the health related components of fitness through that are developed through participation in various sports and recreational activities. Students complete a concept map and then revisit at the end of the unit to identify any learning that has occurred. They design and participate in a circuit of fun fitness activities including jump rope skills.